Helping Children Deal with World Events

Helping Children Deal with World Events

The world can be a scary place. In the last few weeks the news has consistently been unsettling. We have heard and seen reports on terrorist attacks, racial tensions, political uprisings and natural disasters. These are overwhelming for me, but even more so for children. Our natural desire as parents is to try and protect our children from these traumatic events, but that is very difficult to do as everywhere they go people are discussing them.

Because we cannot completely shield our children, here are a few tips that may be helpful as you deal with what is happening around us:

1. Remember every child is different.  We are all created unique, so we all deal with things differently, especially children.  What works for one may not work for all.  Try to see how your child needs to deal and process the events

2. Monitor as best you can how much they are inundated with difficult information.  Limit television and computer time and supervise what they are watching.

3. Give them opportunities to discuss the events. The car is a great place to do this. Be careful doing this right before bed, sometimes that can cause a child to sleep uneasy or have night mares (I know, I was one of those children).

4. Give them some extra assurance that God has His hand on us.  Sometimes this can be a difficult discussion as hard theological questions arise about why these things happen.  These are good things to dialogue about.  It’s okay if you don’t know all of the answers, who of us does? It’s okay to say you don’t know, but we can try to find the answers together.4. Give them some extra assurance that God has His hand on us.  Sometimes this can be a difficult discussion as hard theological questions arise about why these things happen.  These are good things to dialogue about.  It’s okay if you don’t know all of the answers, who of us does? It’s okay to say you don’t know, but we can try to find the answers together.

5. Model appropriate reactions.  Remember they are watching you, even when you think they are not. Make sure you are conveying a trust in God and go to the Bible to show examples of how God has worked in the past.5. Model appropriate reactions.  Remember they are watching you, even when you think they are not. Make sure you are conveying a trust in God and go to the Bible to show examples of how God has worked in the past.

6. Let others help. If your child is overly stressed go talk to their teacher, their coach, their pastor (we are always here to assist). Other people can sometimes be another voice they need to hear. You don’t have to do it alone.

And last give extra hugs and “I love you”s. That can help children feel more secure. If I can help you in any way, please don’t hesitate to contact me: dpotter@trinitybaptist.org

 

 

 

 

 

We are in this together,
Debbie